Lindow Manchester


More Lindow Man Collective Conversations
June 23, 2008, 9:07
Filed under: Police Investigation

Some more Collective Conversations dealing with Lindow Man have been posted recently on You Tube.

The idea of the Collective Conversations project is to facilitate interactions between individuals or groups and objects in the Manchester Museum collections, to film them and make them available on the internet. The idea is to allow participants to share new and meaningful insights about the objects with a wider audience and stimualte further discussion.

The recently recorded conversations include an interview with Andy Mould, who found Lindow Man’s leg on a conveyor belt in August 1984, and an interview with Neville Jones, a retired member of Cheshire C.I.D. and Mr Robert Connolly of the Department of Human Anatomy of the University of Liverpool.

If you are interested in seeing more of our videos on Youtube look up;

http://www.youtube.com/user/ManchesterMuseum

Meanwhile the public programmes associate with Lindow Man are continuing. On Saturday I went out to East Manchester with Pippa, who is Schools Outreach Co-ordinator here at the Museum, and Erin, one of volunteers to support a Refugee Week festival. We took the Lindow Man handling objects with us, including Roman pottery, jewellery and replica clothing and despite the rain we spoke to 120 people. There were stalls, music and dancing and a world food lunch.

Many people we spoke to were amazed by the quality and age of the objects. One lady from Ethiopia immediately recognized a spiindle whorl used for making thread to make cloth. Our example dated from the Iron Age but she was very familiar with objects like this. That sense of continuity and finding links between objects in the collections and people is a real pleasure.

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2 Comments so far
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Here they found the body of Lindow Pete,
He had a red beard, but he had no feet!
They found him near the end of the main runway,
Lying on his side in very heavy clay,
Nobody knows how this came to be,
I think he’d been waiting for the hundred and three!!

Comment by Bill Logan

There is a long standing relationship between archaeology and poetry. Poetic licence allows a lot of things. Technically we could query whether Lindow Man’s red beard was the product of the chemicals in the peat bog (not in very heavy clay) but it woudn’t do to take ourselves too seriously would it?

Comment by bryansitch




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