Lindow Manchester


Campaign Song Again

Here’s another blast from the past from the Manchester Museum Lindow Man files.  But one that has a modern resonance because I spoke about the unsuccessful campaign at last week’s Museums and Restitution conference at the Manchester Museum.

I got a laugh when I said one of the now grown-up children who contributed to the Lindow Man exhibition  really had been there, did do that and still had the t-shirt to prove it!

These children joined the campaign to repatriate Lindow Man’s body to the North West by recording a song, Lindow Man we want you back again (think Grandad we love you but with archaeological lyrics).

Susan Chadwick kindly lent us a photo, her t-shirt and one of her favourite toys from the time. I’ve never seen a tape or record of the song with the packaging so it would be great to see it if anyone out there still has a copy.

It’s a reminder if one were needed, as championed so ably at the Castleford Conference in 2005, that heritage assets should include the intangible elements of  local views of place: things like stones, beliefs, ideas, traditions and oral history. To which we can attach songs and recordings and ephemera associated with campaigns and the like.

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2 Comments so far
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You can find Lindow Man We Want you Back thru this link to YouTube:

Comment by Barbara O'Brien

Delighted to receive this and to hear from Barbara. I tried unsuccessfully to trace Barbara through Grenada about the time of our last Lindow Man exhibition. I’d have loved to talk to her about the repatriation campaign. That said I’ve had an opportunity to talk about it at two conferences recently. Only last week I gave a short paper at the Museums Association conference in Manchester and used an image of the Lindow Man ‘we want you back again’ tshirt the children are wearing in the clip. In a stimulating question and answer session afterwards chaired by Maurice Davies a number of paticipants stressed the importance of dialogue, agreeing to disagree but finding ways of working together. I’d like to think that things have moved on considerably since the 1980s in terms of consultation and developing working relationships with the public.
Bryan

Comment by bryansitch




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